5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 3, 2017 1:33 PM by stevek

    Which seeds are good to start in June?

    mbrown61

      I'm a JP rep and working with setting up a STEM room at the local Boys and Girls Club. Their summer program kicks off early June and we are putting together the curriculum this week. What are some suggestions for starting seeds in June for a summer growth period in eastern North Carolina? The TG will be inside most of the time, but have the ability to take it outside as well. Please advise on plant types and/or resources.

        • Re: Which seeds are good to start in June?
          hciancioso

          I would go look at wncurbanfarms.com and look to see what they are growing since they are located in NC

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          • Re: Which seeds are good to start in June?
            ronllewellyn

            mbrown61, As Holly stated and I recommend, I would order seedlings to start and not start with seeds unless your goal is for them to own the whole germination process as part of their curriculum.  That will get you 2-3 ahead in your summer growth and goal to have mature, fruiting plants by the end of the program.  When does the program end?

             

            I also recommend picking either indoors or outdoors and sticking to it through the whole program.  Going from indoors to the outdoor NC heat of the summer will fry many of the plants!  I know, I live in Mooresville, NC!

             

            If indoors only remember to pick only herbs and greens as the Grow Lights were designed for.  If outside only you can choose fruiting plants and choose herbs and greens that are heat tolerant.  The website will often tell you so for things like lettuce. 

             

            Local to NC:

            http://www.wncurbanfarms.com/

             

            Alternative out of Georgia:

            https://atlurbanfarms.com/

             

            Alternative out of SC:

            https://g2urbanfarms.com/

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            • Re: Which seeds are good to start in June?
              raturf

              Both good answers.  I would point out several things to consider in understanding the Tower Garden process.   The towers are not intended to replace a full size, in the ground garden (unless you are a full blown commercial operation with a large number of towers and deep pockets).  It is important to remember that given the right climate ( including shade cloth where necessary, wind, and heavy rain protection, etc.) any tower friendly crop can be planted at any time.  The tower is not designed to provide a crop for an extended period, it's purpose, and beauty, is that it provides rapid growth to harvest stage, and farm to table freshness, difficult to achieve with other farming methods, but for a short period of time.  My experience is that, when harvested properly, no more than 3 harvests of any variety will meet restaurant quality, but in the meantime, new seedlings are on the bench germinating, and ready to replace the removed plant when the quality of the crop diminishes.

              At that point the tower is cleaned, solution is replaced (metered in through tubes in a larger farm) and you are off to the races with a brand new plant and a fresh harvest.  Bottom line is that you can grow anything the kids would like to work with, but make sure they are plants that are conducive to the Tower principal and not ones that are better off in a soil based garden or bed.

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              • Re: Which seeds are good to start in June?
                stevek

                mbrown61:  I've had good success indoors at home and in schools with mesculan mix, arugula, black seeded simpson, buttercrunch, and red salad bowl. Most of these can be found at your local Wal-mart.  All of these varieties can be harvested in 6 or 7 weeks from seed. Like ronllewellyn said, choose either indoors or outdoors because your lettuces will grow well indoors since it's cool, but can't take the heat outdoors. Tomatoes, etc. will grow great outdoors, but won't do well indoors because of the light requirements for tomatoes.  I'm assuming indoors is air conditioned.  If it isn't then the lettuce varieties won't do as well as the heat climbs.

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